Week 2, Day 2 – Allison Varriale

This morning started off a little bit slow, we had some trouble getting everything together for breakfast, but as soon as Dr. Ward got us straightened out things started rolling much better. We went back out to out to our 5m X 5m grid and to the same 1m X 1m squares we had been digging in yesterday.

Broken bricks and glass, along with bits of old cans, show where trash got dumped from at least the late 1800s through the 1920s.

We worked diligently until it was time to break for lunch. So diligently, in fact, that we were told at least once that we should be taking more breaks, and some of us tried to keep going after being told it was time to stop for the day. We couldn’t help but to be enthusiastic about what we were dong out there. We just keep finding, nails, pieces of glass and bottles, some pottery, and bricks. It felt like the more we found the more we wanted to find. A couple of the groups had some seriously big tree roots to contend with in their squares but everyone kept going despite any adversity that was found.

This image won the photo competition for most accurate shot of an excavation unit.

After lunch it was decided that it would be too hot to continue at our site so we all went to the lab to sort through what we had found both today and yesterday. We learned how to label what we have found into a numbered code with our site number and numbered categories such as 2 for brick and 3 for glass. We also separated finds between artifacts (larger, diagnostic, or intact objects) and lots, the more fragmented pieces, or things that are just less identifiable.

Dr. Dillian was the first one to get to use the machete.

We only finished up in the lab between 5:30 and 6 and some groups still have more to process. Then after a short break we had a wonderful dinner of spaghetti and garlic bread followed by watermelon and chocolate, all while discussing our favorite movies.

Excavation units include historic and prehistoric discoveries.

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